Jurisprudence

Jurisprudence is the science, study, and theory of law. It includes principles behind law that make the law.

 

Scholars of jurisprudence, also known as jurists or legal theorists (including legal philosophers and social theorists of law), hope to obtain a deeper understanding of the nature of law, of legal reasoning, legal systems, and of legal institutions.

 

Modern jurisprudence began in the 18th century and was focused on the first principles of the natural law, civil law, and the law of nations.

Constitutional law is the body of law which defines the relationship of different entities within a state, namely, the executive, the legislature, and the judiciary.

Not all nation states have codified constitutions, though all such states have a jus commune, or law of the land, that may consist of a variety of imperative and consensual rules. These may include customary law, conventions, statutory law, judge-made law, or international rules and norms. Constitutional law deals with the fundamental principles by which the government exercises its authority.

 

In some instances, these principles grant specific powers to the government, such as the power to tax and spend for the welfare of the population. Other times, constitutional principles act to place limits on what the government can do, such as prohibiting the arrest of an individual without sufficient cause.

 

In most nations, including the United States, constitutional law is based on the text of a document ratified at the time the nation came into being. Some constitutions rely heavily on unwritten rules known as constitutional conventions; their status within constitutional law varies, and the terms of conventions are in some cases strongly contested

Law is Specific,
Denotative Language
not Connotative Language
Taught in Public Schools
using a Webster's Fictionary.

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4th Edition Black's Law Dictionary